Tag Archives: greg-johnson

Breakthrough in Regulating Glucose: How I reduced my blood sugar from 329 to 88


To the best of my knowledge, much of what you’re about to read has not been published or discussed anywhere. It’s based on my own personal research and experiences. I’m about to describe some serious failings in how we currently approach regulation of glucose levels and management of diabetes. This article is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure. Contact your healthcare provider before making any significant changes to your exercise or diet.

Most Glucose Readings are Inaccurate

People interested in tracking their blood glucose levels, who have experimented a bit, know that two readings taken at the same time can sometimes be as much 30 points apart. That’s a huge difference. It’s usually because of errors in how the testing is done. However, if you get two readings that are very similar, there’s a likelihood that the average of those two is close to accurate. It may take as many as three readings to know you have an accurate number.

At a cost of up to $1.40 per test strip, most people check their glucose once per day, in the morning, and get only one (probably inaccurate) data point for a 24-hour period. They are left not knowing if their blood glucose increases during the day, or if the morning reading is the highest level for the day.

Having an accurate reading at night and in the morning can help identify conditions such as “The Dawn Phenomenon” and “The Somogyi Effect.” (source)

With only a single morning reading, there’s no awareness about the actual glucose impact of different foods eaten, and no knowledge of how different exercises during the day impact blood sugar levels.

Despite the life saving insight that even just two samples per day could provide, for some reason, insurance companies only pay for one test strip per day.

Glucose Testing Made Financially Accessible

Recently CVS Pharmacy began selling their brand of glucose test strips for $22 per box of 100 strips retail price rather than $140 per box of 100 (what some of the insurance-preferred brand name test strip manufacturers charge). This has really shaken up the industry, and has people asking about the ethics of marking up essential healthcare products to make a 400% increase in profit when people’s lives are at risk.

Now, anyone with $22 can buy a box of 100 test strips and map out what’s causing their diabetes (or high glucose levels), then take corrective action to cure it. Because diabetes is the gateway to a host of other illnesses, big pharmaceutical companies are undoubtedly upset about this development, as are the companies that are trying to sell test strips for $140 per 100 rather than $22 per 100.

What the Healthcare Industry Tells You

Ask just about any doctor about glucose testing, and they will try to convince you that you don’t need to pay attention to your glucose levels during the day “because the numbers fluctuate so much and are meaningless.” Perhaps the doctors are influenced by what the insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies tell them.

Yet, anyone actually testing their own glucose levels will quickly learn how their body responds to various kinds of foods and exercises, and the impact of a sedentary lifestyle becomes measurable.

Positive results of varying degrees can be seen in a matter of hours, days, and weeks. Some exercises have a greater impact than others. Depending on the carbs, sugars, glycemic index, and your own unique metabolic processes, different foods will impact your glucose levels differently.

All of this can be learned by strategically performing your own glucose testing.

Clinical Research for $1 Per Day

We’re talking about in-home clinical research that’s about as complicated as an elementary school science project and costs about 45 cents to $1 per day, and it could save lives. Yet, even with the recent 85%  drop in cost for the CVS test strips, insurance companies refuse to pay for it and doctor’s don’t suggest it.

The fact is that most people are on their own with regard to predictive and preventative care. Even if you go to an integrative medicine doctor, most insurance companies won’t cover exploratory procedures and preventative treatments.

So, in the case of blood sugar management, you’ll probably need to pay with your own money to get a glucose tester and test strips, because in some cases insurance companies will only cover the cost of brand name testers, and even then they only cover one test strip per day.

Our current industrial medical complex, despite possessing billions of our dollars, apparently can’t or won’t conduct this basic research, so it’s up to each individual to clinically study and learn about their own health conditions to develop a personalized wellness regime. This, of course, should be done in collaboration with an practitioner of integrative medicine, and it’s good to continue with a traditional doctor for whatever minimal care is offered by the insurance companies.

Since I seem to be banging on the same drum as everyone else in proclaiming the failings of western medicine, I should state that there is much good research being done, and many good people having a positive impact who work in various sectors of the healthcare industry. So, it’s not the people who have failed us, it’s the system itself that’s not serving us as well as it could. Just as large corporations have too much monied influence over our government, they also have too much selfish influence over the healthcare industry.

Danger! Call your doctor immediately!

About a mont ago, my glucose levels were reaching over 300 as you can see in the reading below.


The standard medical advisory for readings this high is: “Danger. Call your doctor immediately.” (Source: University of Washington)

I was alarmed. I knew I had to do something. So, I did, and below you can see the results before and after about 30 days later.




I should share some of the background leading up to my high glucose reading. By the way, when I saw the reading above of over 300, I didn’t call my doctor immediately. Here’s why…

For many years I’ve been periodically testing my blood sugar levels. Year after year, they were normal.

In the fall of 2013, I’d started using a protein drink mix called Muscle Milk. I created a video about the experience. The protein drink does what it promises. It produces amazing levels of energy and strength. However, in the process, it raises cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar levels.

However, I didn’t realize what was going on with my health, until several weeks into using the product and I had my annual physical. The doctor immediately declared me to be a diabetic, wanted to put me on high blood pressure medication, and was alarmed about my cholesterol levels. I was really surprised since I’d not previously had trouble with my blood sugar being high. Yet, it was close to 140 according to the lab work. That’s the highest I’d ever seen it.

I explained that I’d been using a nutritional supplement that I suspected had skewed the lab results. I asked if we could wait on the high blood pressure medicine. The doctor reluctantly agreed to wait on the high blood pressure medicine, but insisted that I take Metformin to help regulate my blood sugar.

I thought to myself, “What could go wrong?”

Well, here’s what went wrong.

I started taking the Metformin prescription and noticed my blood sugar levels were increasing. Every few days the numbers were higher. Soon my blood sugar levels were up to 180, then 220, then one day they reached 285 while on the Metformin. “This is crazy,” I thought.

I immediately stopped taking Metformin, and did some online research. I read that “patients taking metformin can also experience high blood sugar.” (source) I’m glad I’d been checking my blood sugar regularly rather than once per day in the morning. Otherwise I might have been unaware of the danger I was in.

For me this was just another disappointing experience where I was trying to play by the rules, and doing what the doctor had ordered, and my condition became worse.

It took me months to bring my blood sugar levels back down. Without much provocation at all, they’d be back up again. The extreme reaction I was having to foods high in sugars and carbs was alarming, but it allowed me to have a very sensitive measurement tool to evaluate a lot of different foods.

Using my own body as a research lab, I tested various foods and exercises to learn more about their impact on glucose levels. By February 2015, the testing was over. It had to be. Eating a typical American diet was resulting in blood sugar levels of over 300.

I gathered all my research from the past year of testing, and put it all to work. The result was a return to normal levels in about 30 days.

I’m going to publish more details about my findings in the coming weeks.

To learn more, read the health section of my March 2015 news update.

120 Day Challenge #3 – Update for April 10 – May 14 2013 – Day 33


On 10 April 2013, I started my third 120-Day challenge. Taking what I’d learned from successes and failures over the first two 120-day challenges, I began revising my approach. I won’t bore you with what failed. What seems to be working now is the following:

  • Going for brisk walks in the evenings (about 30 minutes).
  • Increasing my morning workout from about 20 minutes up to 30 minutes.
  • Reducing bread intake.
  • Avoiding chips and sweets.
  • Increasing water intake.
  • Going to bed early.
  • Taking multi-vitamins.
  • Staying away from coffee since it may disrupt sleep and/or cause arthritis-like symptoms for some people.
  • Drinking the iced green tea latte from Starbucks with extra Matcha powder. The milk may offer some additional calcium absorption which is known to help with weight loss.

So, that’s my current formula for weight loss. It’s fairly simple and has nothing extreme.

Tofu and Snap Peas in Caramelized Leek Sauce
 with Spiced Rice and Beet Greens by BurtFamilyFoodServices.com

“One of the meals in this week’s food plan from BurtFamilyFoodServices.com was the Tofu and Snap Peas in Caramelized Leek Sauce with Spiced Rice and Beet Greens pictured above. With each week’s meal plan, Dave provides a list showing what meals are included and how to best prepare them. The containers of food are coded for easy identification. For optimal flavor, care is given to indicate which meals are best eaten earlier in the week and which can keep longer under refrigeration. From my experience, the food keeps well and tastes great even when eaten a few days later in the week. So, that’s a plus.” ~ Greg Johnson